Saturday, June 8, 2013

Etowah Indian Mounds: Trees, Plants, & Grasses




Trees shade the bank of the Etowah River at Etowah Indian Mounds
 
While the current North Georgia landscape is covered with forage grasses introduced by early white settlers to feed livestock, the native grasses of the Etowah Valley were quite different five hundred to one thousand years ago. Etowah Indian Mounds State Historic Site is reintroducing native grasses to the site.



 

 


 
Eastern gamagrass (Tripsacum dactyloides)
(Click on photo for larger view to read text)
Bushy Bluestem (Andropogon glomeratus)
Little Bluestem (Schizachyrium scoparium)
Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardi)
 
River Oats or Northern Sea Oats (Chasmanthium latifolium)
Poverty oatgrass (Danthonia Spicata)
Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum)
Indian Grass (Sorghastrum nutans)
River Oats (Chasmanthium latifolium)
Aster (Aster cordifolia)
Mouse-eared coreopsis
(Coreopsis auriculata)
 
Eastern gamagrass (Tripsacum dactyloides)
Iron Weed (Veronia Novaborensis)
Sundrops (Oenothera fruticosa)


Big Bluestem (Andropogon gerardi)
Mondarda (Mondara fistulosa)
Blackeyed Susan (Rudbeckia fulgida)



Bushy Bluestem (Andropogon glomeratus)
Crimson-eyed rosamallow (hibiscus moscheutos)
Cardinal flower (Lobelia cardinalis)
 






Switchgrass (panicum virgatum)
Tall coreopsis (coreopsis tripteris)
Goldenrod (solidago spp)




 




Indian Grass (Sorghastrum nutans)
Tennessee Coneflower (Echinacea tennesseensis)
Columbine (Aquilegia Canadensis)






Poverty oatgrass (Danthonia Spicata)
Fire Pink (Silene virginica)
Skullcap (Scutellaria ovate)


 
Water Oak (Meskolwv)
Water Oak leaves were used to wrap dough to make bread.
The bark is used as an astringent, tonic, and antiseptic.



















 

 
 

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